Back to School: What’s New in Store

Labour Day is quickly approaching and back to school merchandise is sold by the crate loads. Books, binders, pens, Oh my!!!! What about what to wear? I remember the first day of school was really important, especially if it was a new school, even high school. Even though, I knew some of the kids moving into grade 9, who had graduated with me, I also knew I would be meeting new kids from other schools as well.

Wearing the new duds made a first impression, that spoke volumes about your personality. After my first year in high school it wasn’t so important to keep up those first impressions but more important to be unique. I see so much conformity among young people today that expressing your individuality seems to lead to separation, rather than integration. But I found friends that were like-minded, we shared the same taste in music, we liked to dress in black and shopped in vintage stores.

We were not the cool kids, but we were cool to each other. We didn’t seek to impress anyone else but each other. We bought ¾ length wool car coats, sailor caps, Parachute jackets, Balloon pants and long, ankle length skirts. We wore black sweaters that were way too big and covered from neck to knees.

We wore different colors in our hair, our earrings were long and dangled down to our clavicles and we listened to INXS, The Cure and Siouxie and the Bandshees.

I have chosen some items, which will be uploaded into my store Shuushuu by Lulu for the Autumn. Whether you wear them for school or a new job or an evening out with friends, I think you will be able to express yourself in style! (Coming Soon!!!!)

1970s White Jersey Dress in Vogue vs Diane Von Furstenberg Black Jersey Maxi Dress

This classic style dress can be worn with a contrasting belt sitting on the hips. Because of its shirt design and its length it can be worn so many different ways.

Black Floral 1970s Jersey Body Suit vs 1970s Body Suit in Vogue Magazine

The Anne Klein Black Wool Pleated Skirt, as shown in Vogue magazine September 1973

These two pieces would be fabulous worn together with a great wide belt. The skirt is a beautiful thick wool crepe designed by Anne Klein and features the Lion Head Trademark on the label.

I hope you enjoyed this blog…Till Next Time!!!

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Dating Vintage by Fabric

The Vintage Fashion Guild recently released a comprehensive guide to fabrics, which includes textures, types of printed patterns, weave, and material. As I was perusing the different fabrics listed there were a few items I think needed to be mentioned to aid in dating vintage clothing as well. Some of these do fall under the category of Polyester and have Trademark names, because the fibres were produced/created by different companies. Companies like ENKA, Imperial Chemical Industries and Dupont. Polyesters are made from chemical substances found mainly in petroleum and are manufactured in fibers. I have included the link to this site:

http://vintagefashionguild.org/fabric-resource-a-z

Crimplene: (polyester) is a thick yarn used to make a fabric of the same name. The resulting cloth is heavy, wrinkle-resistant and retains its shape well. Britain’s defunct ICI Fibres Laboratory developed the fibre in the early 1950s and named it after the Crimple Valley in the UK in which the company was situated. Crimplene was used in garments that required a permanently pressed look, such as skirts and trousers. The fabric enjoyed popularity upon introduction in the 1950s in response to its convenient ‘wash-and-wear’ properties. Crimplene was often used to make the typical A-line dress and 1960s fashion. Likewise, it was popular amongst men in British MOD culture for use in garish button down shirts. In the early 1970s, Crimplene began to fall out of fashion. Other, lighter-weight polyester fabrics like Trevira replaced Crimplene for their ease of movement and ventilation.

Crimplene Label on a 1960s Tennis Dress

Trevira: is a thermoplastic polymer resin of the polyester family and is used in synthetic fibers. Polyester is naturally resilient, meaning it doesn’t wrinkle easily and wrinkles tend to fall out overnight. There were a selection of Vintage Advertisements for this fabric in the 1970s in Vogue magazine.

Trevira Star Vintage Ad Vogue May 1970

Dacron: 1960/70s trademark for a polyester fiber. Dacron is a condensation polymer obtained from ethylene glycol and terephthalic acid. Its properties include high tensile strength, high resistance to stretching, both wet and dry, and good resistance to degradation by chemical bleaches and to abrasion. The continuous filament yarn is used in curtains, dress fabrics, high-pressure fire hoses, men’s shirts, and thread. The staple fiber is ideal for mixing with wool in men’s and women’s suits, as well as in dress fabrics, knitted wear, and washable woven sportswear.

Dacron Advertisement as seen in Vogue 1970s

Celanese Arnel: 1940/50s. AAn Acetate fiber. Just defined as ”synthetic fabric”. Later, you may get your knuckles rapped by the Celanese Corporation, which happens to make Arnel with a capital ”A” and points out that it is a triacetate fiber and not a fabric.

Celanese Arnel Fabric Vintage Advertisement. Cute Skirt!

Orlon: Acrylic. The Dupont Corporation created the first acrylic fibers in 1941 and trademarked them under the name Orlon.

Bianchini Silk: Vintage fabric of silk made by reknowned manufacturer Bianchini- Ferier. Bianchini Férier (originally Atuyer Bianchini Férier) was created in 1888 by three former employees of one of the city’s renowned manufacturers of high fashion silks. They embarked on the manufacture and sale of the highest quality silk fabrics, the haute nouveauté. This was the sector of fabric manufacture most closely linked to Parisian high fashion dress design

Tricopaque: A blend of fibers, including Nylon. I have seen lounge wear in this fabric, most notably from Vanity Fair.

Some of the fabrics or fiber names you may come across in vintage clothing are trademarks and may be mentioned on the labels. These include Vycron, Encron, Corfam, Qiana, Avril, Antron III Nylon and Mylar.

Vycron Advertisment in Life Magazine August 1960

For more information there is a comprehensive handy guide here:

http://reviews.ebay.com/Identifying-Fabrics-amp-Fibers-Details-amp-Burn-Tests?ugid=10000000000951489

Cole of California Swim Wear-It’s Getting Hot!!!

A sexy post for a hot summer day! It’s 33oC outside and with the humidity rising, it’s getting hotter, and sweatier. Cole of California is an American swim wear company that produces fabulous swim suits for both in and out of the water. Their suits are sexy, functional and may produce strange tan lines.

The Company started out of a knitwear company called West Coast Manchester Knitting Mills by founder Fred Cole back in 1923. Fred Cole was an actor, at the time the family business was making long knit underwear. Fred was not interested in these boring, functional, utilitarian garments. He wanted glamour, the kind he had a taste of in Hollywood. He found Margit Felligi, who was a Costume Designer. And from 1936 to 1972, she designed some of the most creative, provocative and innovative bathing suits during her reign. She was known for her creative use of Latex, Nylon and Spandex. And in 1965 she rocked the swimsuit world with her “Scandal Suit,” a daring one-piece suit with a plunging net front.

Cole of California The Scandal Suit Designed by Margit Felligi in 1965

The Company signed Esther Williams to represent the company, 1950: and in 1951 (before she had her own line) Esther Williams was the spokeswoman for Cole swimsuits. One ad read:

“Here’s the perfect suit for real swimmers… the best I’ve ever worn. It will really do something for your form – in or out of the water.”

Cole of California Produced swim wear for Dior in 1955. They launched the Anne Cole collection in 1982, she is Fred Cole’s daughter. She also introduced the Tankini in 1997. The company is still producing swimwear, with their sister company, Anne Cole, and is designed by Anne.

I pulled some advertisements from Vogue magazines to show a progression of vintage swimwear from a highly collectible name as Cole of California. They are all sexy and cool including the slogan, “Never in the history of Mankind, has so little done so much for so many.”

White Two Piece Swim Suit in Vogue July 1944

                             Black 1 piece Swimsuit Vogue April 1973

 

Cole of California Beach- Leisure Cover Up Vogue Sept 1973-Model looks like Cheryl Tiegs

Cole of California Plunging Neckline Swim Suit- Vogue Nov 1973

Cole of California Vogue Nov 1975

Cole of California Vogue Nov 1976- This suit looks like a second Skin!!!!

Black Micro Polka Dot One Piece Swim Suit in Vogue June 1977

Cole of California Vogue Nov 1977- Love the print on this Swim Suit!!!!

Cole of California Vogue Nov 1981- Great texture and it’s white Ooo La La!!!!

I hope you have enjoyed this post! Till Next Time! Check out my store for other great Swimsuits and for a limited time I have a sale on, look in store announcements for details!!Lulu

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Sandra Leichman- Fashion Illustrator

I could not find very much information on Stephen Keyes, so I tried Sandra Leichman. There wasn’t very much information on the internet about this American fashion illustrator either. Although both artists had features in Vogue magazine presented in different advertisements, there isn’t very much biographical info out there. Sandra Leichman was a staff artist for Fairchild, which also included artists like Antonio Lopez and Steven Meisel among others. There is a book called WWD Illustrated in which Sandra Leichman is featured. As well, a curator named Charles Kleibacker did an exhibition of these works for an Ohio institution back in 2008. The purpose of such an exhibition, featured some 50 garments and more than 100 illustrations, allowed it to expand on the idea of the interplay between garments and their illustrations.

Here are a few examples of Sandra Leichman’s Work as seen in Vogue:

Sandra Leichman- Fashion Illustrator Vogue Nov 1973

Sandra Leichman- Fashion Illustrator Vogue Nov 1975

Sandra Leichman- Fashion Illustrator Vogue Oct 1976

If anyone has information regarding this Fashion Illustrator, I would greatly appreciate it and I will add it to the blog post. Thank you!

I hope you enjoyed this post…Till Next Time!

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The Evolution of the Bvlgari Ad

This is the evolution of the Bvlgari Advertisements as seen in Vogue magazines from the years of 1970 to 1985. Some of the images depicted will be from Accessory spreads done in the magazines as well.

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About Bulgari:

Italian Jewelers since 1884. The company name was developed on its Greek founders name Sotirio Voulgaris. The store, opened 1905 on the Via dei Condotti,  quickly became a place where the world’s rich and famous came for the unique, high quality jewelry designs combining Greek and Roman art. Today it is a global and diversified luxury brand with a product and services portfolio of jewels, watches, accessories, fragrances, skincare, hotels and resorts featuring exceptional quality, an innovative style and impeccable service.

Each Bulgari jewel is the result of a unique heritage and tradition of excellence. The bold and elegant style that fuses classic and contemporary is the paramount feature of Bulgari’s distinctive jewelry designs. Extraordinary hand-selected stones inspire the design team’s sketches, which are turned into stunning reality in the hands of expert craftsmen.

Bulgari celebrated its 125th Anniversary in 2009. It was acquired by the LVMH Moet Hennesey Louis Vuitton SA Group in 2011. And is now publicly owned by shareholders. (this information was gathered from the Bulgari website ans well as Wikipedia)

There is an amazing selection of vintage jewels in the above slideshow. maybe one day…

I hope you enjoyed this blog…Till Next Time!!!

Fashion Illustrator- Antonio Lopez

There are not too many Fashion Industry companies seemingly interested in using Fashion illustrators these days. When one looks through a current magazine, it is all about the photo. And what that photo captures, which goes way beyond the clothes. I have seen Nordstom’s adverts in Vogue magazines where Ruben Toledo, the husband of Fashion Designer Isabel Toledo is featured in multi-page spreads. I have also seen only his talent being used as backdrops with models featured in the foreground.

Fashion illustrator’s such as Stavrinos, Cellars, ect. Seem to be long gone from the pages of high style. The industry lost Antonio Lopez a number of years ago to Karposi Sarcoma due to AIDS on March 17 1987. But he was very well known and was featured in magazines such as Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Elle and Interview (Andy Warhol). He was 44 years of age when he died.

I found an article about Mr. Lopez in an American Vogue magaine from March 1982. Five years before his death. These are some of the highlights:

“Illustrators- as vital to the fashion industry as the designers themsevles. Antonio Lopez is part of this international fashion circle…”

nspiration from a Ralph Lauren Native American Collection-Vogue March 1982

“ From the moment his drawings were published…in the early 60s Antonio has been in demand.”

Antonio Lopez seen in Vogue Sept 1983 in an advertisement for Missoni

“He has designed advertising campaign’s in the Untied States, France, japan and Australia.”

Antonio Lopez seen in Vogue Sept 1983 in an advertisement for Oscar de la Renta

“…has done illustrations for French designers such as Yves Saint Laurent, Chloe…”

A woman’s portrait and an illustration for Gianfranco Ferre Vogue march 1982

“Antonio loves girls, loves night-life, has discovered some of the most beautiful models of our time-including Jerry hall.”

At the time this article was released Antonio Lopez has a book coming out called Antonio’s Girls. Published by Thames and Hudson in 1982.

Antonio’s Girls Book Cover 1982

I hope you enjoyed this blog post…Till Next Time!!! Lulu

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MONET Vintage Jewelry Collecting

My first pair of Monet earrings I collected were a petite pair of silver tone clip ons with black round glass stones surrounded by little marquisettes. They had the signature earring clasp on the back that looked like someone stuck their thumb down and attached it to a hinge. They were also signed on the back in a script. I thought they were the cutest pair of earrings. Alas they are now in someone else’s care and safekeeping.

Monet Gold tone Choker Black and Clear Glass Square Cut Rhinestones. Click on Photo to BUY!!!!

I have since these first pair been collecting earrings, brooches and necklaces from the MONET brand. I have been impressed with the quality and how well these costume pieces have aged over time. But that is the trademark of Monet since it’s inception in 1937. The jewelry produced is very durable with lasting quality. Monet was also responsible for several technological advancements in jewelry such as the friction ear clip and the barrel clutch for pierced earrings.

Monet Navy Blue and White Cabochons set in Textured Gold Tone Nautical Design Clip On Earrings. Click on Photo to Buy!!!

Before 1955, Monet Jewelry was characterized by their use of precious metals and their unique designs. However, in 1955, it became easier for people who wanted genuine, vintage jewelry from this manufacturer to differentiate them from imitators of their designs. In that year, genuine jewelry carried the Monet Trademark.

Monet Textured Gold Tone Settings with Black Enamel Pentagon Design Centers in Clip On Earrings. Click on Photo to Buy!!!!

Collector’s who want genuine Monet pieces should know the various companies who have had the rights to create these trademark designs. From 1969 to 1989, General Mills acquired Monocraft Products Company, the company that held rights to Monet the longest. From 1989 to 1994, the jewelry was sold through Crystal Brands Jewelry Group, and from 1994 to 2000, Chase Capital Partners, Lattice Holding. Presently, Liz Claiborne, Inc. produces Monet Jewelry, a right they’ve held since 2000. As of July 26, 2000, Monet Group Inc. was acquired by Liz Claiborne Inc. Monet Group, formerly called Crystal Brands Jewelry group, is a manufacturer costume jewelry. It markets under the Monet, Monet Pearl, Monet Signature, Monet2, Trifari and Marvella brands.

The Monet jewelry made today still maintains its high quality and quantity of production. It is still able to change styles and designs capable of meeting the competitive market of today in costume jewelry.

Since I also collect vintage Vogue magazines, I found some advertisements for Monet jewelry and have posted them from three different decades, here:

Monet Vogue September 1968

Monet Vogue May 1976

Monet Pearls- Vogue November 1984. I believe the model is Paulina Porzikova.

Resources:

http://www.ehow.com/about_5052474_monet-jewelry.html

http://investing.businessweek.com/research/stocks/private/snapshot.asp?privcapId=31692

http://www.jacksonjewels.com/Reference/Jewelry_Companies_M-O.htm

http://www.collectiblejewels.com/monet.html

I hope you enjoyed this post, Till Next Time!!!!