What’s New-In Store @ Shuushuu by Lulu

Two very distinctly 1970s vintage clothing pieces are being featured today!! The first is a black shimmering shirt-dress of classic styling by Caron Chicago. This lovely dress is a very light-weight polyester material. It has a great full skirt, cuffed wrists with a slight balloon effect, gathered epaulettes at eh shoulder with slight padding and concealed button down front. Just click on the picture and it will open the store window. The belt is sold separately and available in the store. Please check the Women’s VTG Accessories Section. (Yes…that is a young Rene Russo modelling for Vogue).

1970s Long Sleeve Shirt Dress in Shimmering Black by Caron Vs 1970s Short Sleeve Shirt Dress Featured in Vogue

The second fashion item is a fabulous Striped blouse with a necktie. The blouse features a fantastic necktie and futuristic chevron stripes in black, white and latte colors. It has a great wide buttoned cuff. It is made of a light-weight polyester material. Just click on the picture and it will open the store window. The other items featured in the picture are sold separately!!!

1970s Necktie Blouse vs Emanuel Ungaro Printed Necktie Blouse Featured in Vogue

Thank you for stopping by…Till Next Time!!!!!

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Vintage Sunglasses

Geoffrey Beene sunglasses ad-Vogue June 1977

The Bigger the Better!!! Sunglasses from the 1970s are large, light and fantastic. Some of these sunglasses do not suit some face shapes, but you can find a pair that does because they came in great shapes and sizes from fabulous designer names such as Yves Saint Laurent and Christian Dior.

The frames have wonderful simulated textures, patterns and gradient lenses as well. These are some advertisements found in Vogue in the 1970’s depicting some hot sunglasses!!!!!

 

Yves Saint Laurent Sunglasses Ad- Vogue May 1976

 

Fabulous Christian Dior Sunglasses Advert- Vogue 1970s

You can find some amazing frames on the web including my shop Shuushuu by Lulu and Ebay. Some of the things to look for when considering buying vintage sunglasses are the condition of the lenses. Are they scratched? Do they have any peeling (meaning the film is coming off or has holes)? Are they Arms chewed (it is a bad habit but some people do chew on the arms of their frames)? Do they have any white film on the nose or arms behind the ears (although this can be cleaned with a little elbow grease, it may be a question to ask the seller)? Featured in Shuushuu by Lulu:

Courreges White Pearl 1970s Sunglasses

1960s Vintage Retro Sunglasses Marked "France"

 

Some collectible names to watch out for are: Ray Ban (especially wayfarers), Ted Lapidus, Emmanuelle Kahn, Oliver Goldsmith, Courreges, Pierre Cardin and Polaroid to name a few.

1970s Sunglasses Advert from Vogue

Thank you for stopping by…Till Next Time!!!!!!

Summer 2012 Trend- Color Blocking

This color-blocking trend is Hot for Spring and Summer 2012. The idea of how to color block is to take a color wheel and put an equilateral triangle on it and the points are the colors you can use together. So three points means three color combinations.

Design Basics- Color Wheel

I have 2 examples of color blocking, which I attempted using vintage clothing in very similar colors. The colors used are pink, yellow and blue in soft hues. Basically I used the Primary colors. You can tell me which works better:

 

1) Electric Blue t-shirt, DKNY Raspberry wool Skirt and Butter Yellow Acrylic Cardigan with a bubblegum pink bauble necklace.

1)      Electric Blue t-shirt, DKNY Raspberry wool Skirt and Butter Yellow Acrylic Cardigan with a bubblegum pink bauble necklace.

Ralph Lauren Pale blue Wool long Skirt, Butter Yellow Acrylic Cardigan over a Dusty Rose mock-neck turtleneck sleeveless top with a bubblegum pink bauble necklace.

 

2)      Ralph Lauren Pale blue Wool long Skirt, Butter Yellow Acrylic Cardigan over a Dusty Rose mock-neck turtleneck sleeveless top with a bubblegum pink bauble necklace.

You can also use complementary colors with a third color as well. For example: Yellow and Purple with Red. I found an example of colors you can use from these Expressionist paintings:

German Expressionism Painting- Red-Yellow-Blue

 

German Expressionism- Green, Purple, Orange

I will attempt to make a few more of these color block examples featuring clothing from my store in the coming weeks.

This example is from Marc Jacobs at New York Fashion Week 2012 for the Spring-Summer Collections:

Marc Jacobs 2012 Color Blocking-Tang Powder, fuchsia and teal

Hope you enjoyed this blog by Vintage North…Till Next Time!!!!!

Canadian Designer -Wayne Clark

Lately, clothing is manufactured in China. So today I am mentioning Canadian design made in Canada. Since I’m always talking about vintage, I know he used to manufacture his clothing in Canada. But competition and remaining viable in the fashion industry today warrants most clothing to be manufactured off shore. Celebrating great design and workmanship means taking a look at one of Canada’s Iconic designers, Wayne Clark. He is a Fashion designer to the stars, whom include Jane Fonda, Cindy Crawford, Rihanna, Sarah Polley and Vivica A. Fox. He has been working since the late 80s to present day, dressing wonderful women in beautiful clothes and remaining strictly Canadian. Wayne Clark was born in Drumheller, Alberta in 1949. He studied at the Alberta College of Art and graduated from the Fashion Design program at Sheridan College in Oakville, ON in 1973. A program I, myself had been enrolled in back in 1986-88. He went to London, England and apprenticed with Savile Row icon Hardy Amies for 18 months and worked as an assistant costume designer on the film The Romantic Englishwoman in 1975. Clark designed for manufacturer Aline Marelle when he returned to Toronto in 1977. He established his own woman’s wear collection in 1989, making dramatic evening gowns and well-tailored sportswear. With close to 30 years in the fashion industry, Wayne Clark has been able to create a brand that is synonymous with glamour and luxury.

In April 2008, The International Fashion Group honoured Clark with a retrospective of his Fashion through Illustration. It featured his drawings of magnificent luxury gowns. Of this process Clark states:

“Everybody always says, ‘Oh, you most love what you do.’ On the very rare day, I do. More often than not it’s just hard work. But this [the sketches] is the fun part.”

Wayne Clark Fashion Illustration

Wayne Clark has a studio located in Toronto on Carlaw Ave. You can check out current design work here: http://wayneclarkdesign.com

The Classic Little Black Dress- by Wayne Clark

Resources:

http://www.xtra.ca/public/Toronto/Wayne_Clark_Red_carpet_runway_through_time-5638.aspx

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/articles/wayne-clark

Till Next Time!!!!!!!

What’s New-In Store

Recently, I have expanded my Etsy store to include Men’s and Women’s clothing. Occasionally, I will feature some items in my blog, Vintage North that will correspond with Something awesome I found in an old magazine. Basically, it’s cross referencing!! So I know what I am talking about, so you know that I know what I am talking about and you will be able to share the information so you know what you are talking about to your friends!!!

As I was shifting through my Vogue magazine from Sept 1 1970 (they published two magazines a month up until the early 80s.) I was delighted to find some silhouettes that were similar to clothing I was carrying in my store. It validates (no pun intended) the era I assigned the garment to as vintage.

The first image is of a Leslie Fay Knit dress paired with a Short Sleeve knit dress labelled from Tabou Paris:

Leslie Fay vs. Tabou Paris 1970s knit dresses

I do not have a belt or tie showing on the Tabou Dress. it did not come with one, but you can accessorize this very simple silhouette in a way that makes it unique to your fashion sense.

The second outfit is from Anne Klein and Liz Claiborne. Also from the same magazine. Culottes were coming in for Spring and Autumn. They were featured in beautiful wool fabrics. In the pictures shown below both are paired with a classic white shirt:

Anne Klein vs. Liz Claiborne 1970s Culottes

The Liz Claiborne cullotes shown here are in a rich Chocolate brown corduroy!!I have paired mine with Liz Claiborne dark brown leather belt (also carried in the store on a different listing, please look in the Women’s Accessories section). The big sash is a very Spanish style. Back in the 70s culottes were worn with tall boots and lovely full capes made of wool and came in check patterns.

I hope you enjoyed this post…till next time!!!

Vintage Fashion Illustration

I am going to post some fashion illustrations I found in my Vogue Magazines.The most influential illustrator for me, growing up and looking at Glamour and Vogue magazines whenever i can get my hands on them was George Stavrinos. I didn’t know anything about him, but i loved to look at the architectural construction of his work.

George Stavrinos (1948-1990) was an American illustrator. Born in Somerville Massachusetts he graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1969. After a year of study abroad he began working for Pushpin Studios. Below is an advert featuring Gianfranco Ferre!!!

This next illustrator I could not find any information on them on the internet. The name is RRT Sonche. He/She drew for Vogue Magazine back in the mid-40s and Illustrated some adverts such as the one below depicting a model in a Maurice Rentner, sold at Kauffmanns:

The next Illustrator is Cuca Romley. She was born in Madrid Spain and Currently resides in New York City. Her drawings were featured in ads for kimberly Fashions.The first illustration was featured in Vogue May 1970 and the second was in Vogue March 1 1971. Cuca Romley is a well known well established artist, who has completed many shows from 1955-2010.

The next illustration i do not know who drew the picture but the combination of colors was so striking,When I saw it for the first time again in over 10 years, i instantly remembered this Dior advertisement.

I have some more illustrations including the Ruben Toledo ads for Nordstrom and the illustrations for the Manolo Blahnik shoe ads (they will be added in later). Posted below:

Manolo Blahnik Vogue Sept 2006

 

Manolo Blahnik -Vogue Sept 2010

Unfortunately I can not find a signature on these illustrations, so i do not know who has created them unless it is the designer himself. I love the second pair. I think they would be quite stunning when realized!!!!!!!

Ruben Toledo is the husband of Fashion Designer Isabel Toledo.They married in 1984. He draws her inspirations, then they bring them to fruition. Their relationship is truly a collaboration. Born in Cuba, he now lives in New York with his wife.

I hope you enjoyed this post…till Next time!!!!!!

Decoding the Fashion label

Last time I blogged about the ILGWU…this is a good indicator of finding a vintage clothing item because the ILGWU merged into the Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees Union in 1995. Another indicator for discovering vintage clothing in Canada is looking for labels without French and English titling on them.

Canada is a bilingual nation. The need for French labeling was important so the many habitants in the nation who spoke French and used French as their first language could read the labels of clothing, food, ect. The official language Act was passed on 1974 and The Charter of the French language was passed in 1977.

The purpose of this language law was to re-affirm the desire of the great majority of Quebecois to make French the common language of work, instruction, communications, commerce and business. The Charter of the French Language established a series of rights and obligations, namely the right for consumers to be informed in French and the obligation for the retail industry to offer products and related literature in French on the Québec market. This results in:

Retailers’ responsibility to make sure that inscriptions on products and on their packaging and the documents that accompany them, are in compliance with the law;

Manufacturers’ and distributors’ responsibility to deliver to the retailers’ products and documents, which effectively comply with the law.

The labels:

Included in the information found on clothing labels are Company Name, Content, Care instructions, Registered identification numbers, manufacturing Country and size.

Where the garment has been manufactured, must be stated not where it was designed. It is common that the clothing company that designed the garment is not located in the same country where it is manufactured. So if the design house is in New York, but the garment was made in Vietnam, the label would state: “Made in Vietnam”.

These days symbols are used for the care instructions. What do they mean?

Symbol Description
Washing symbol: Wash in commercial machine in water not exceeding 95°C, at normal setting Wash in commercial machine in water not exceeding 95°C, at normal setting.
Washing symbol: Wash in commercial machine in water not exceeding 95°C, at permanent press setting Wash in commercial machine in water not exceeding 95°C, at permanent press setting.
Washing symbol: Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 70°C, at normal setting Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 70°C, at normal setting.
Washing symbol: Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 60°C, at normal setting Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 60°C, at normal setting.
Washing symbol: Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 60°C, at permanent press setting Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 60°C, at permanent press setting.
Washing symbol: Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 50°C, at normal setting Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 50°C, at normal setting.
Washing symbol: Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 50°C, at permanent press setting Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 50°C, at permanent press setting.
Washing symbol: Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 50°C, at delicate/gentle setting Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 50°C, at delicate/gentle setting.
Washing symbol: Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 40°C, at normal setting Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 40°C, at normal setting.
Washing symbol: Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 40°C, at permanent press setting Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 40°C, at permanent press setting.
Washing symbol: Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 40°C, at delicate/gentle setting Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 40°C, at delicate/gentle setting.
Washing symbol: Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 30°C, at normal setting Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 30°C, at normal setting.
Washing symbol: Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 30°C, at permanent press setting Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 30°C, at permanent press setting.
Washing symbol: Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 30°C, at delicate/gentle setting Wash in domestic or commercial machine in water not exceeding 30°C, at delicate/gentle setting.
Washing symbol: Wash gently by hand in water not exceeding 40°C Wash gently by hand in water not exceeding 40°C.
Washing symbol: Wash gently by hand in water not exceeding 30°C Wash gently by hand in water not exceeding 30°C.
Washing symbol: Wash in domestic or commercial machine at any temperature, at normal setting Wash in domestic or commercial machine at any temperature, at normal setting.
Washing symbol: Do not wash Do not wash.
Use of Dots For Defining Temperature of Water for Washing Symbol
Symbol Definition Description
6 dot symbol 95°C Near boil
5 dot symbol 70°C Extremely hot
4 dot symbol 60°C Very hot
3 dot symbol 50°C Hot
2 dot symbol 40°C Warm
1 dot symbol 30°C Cool
Bleaching Symbols
Symbol Description
Bleaching symbol: Use any bleach when needed Use any bleach when needed.
Bleaching symbol: Use only non-chlorine bleach when needed Use only non-chlorine bleach when needed.
Bleaching symbol: Do not bleach Do not bleach.
Drying Symbols
Symbol Description
Drying symbol: Tumble dry at high heat (not exceeding 75°C) at normal setting Tumble dry at high heat (not exceeding 75°C) at normal setting.
Drying symbol: Tumble dry at medium heat (not exceeding 65°C) at normal setting Tumble dry at medium heat (not exceeding 65°C) at normal setting.
Drying symbol: Tumble dry at medium heat (not exceeding 65°C) at permanent press setting Tumble dry at medium heat (not exceeding 65°C) at permanent press setting.
Drying symbol: Tumble dry at low heat (not exceeding 55°C) at permanent press setting Tumble dry at low heat (not exceeding 55°C) at permanent press setting.
Drying symbol: Tumble dry at a low heat (not exceeding 55°C) at delicate cycle Tumble dry at a low heat (not exceeding 55°C) at delicate cycle.
Drying symbol: Tumble dry any heat Tumble dry any heat.
Drying symbol: Tumble dry no heat/air dry Tumble dry no heat/air dry.
Drying symbol: Do not tumble dry Do not tumble dry.
Drying symbol: After extraction of excess water, line dry/hang to dry After extraction of excess water, line dry/hang to dry.
Drying symbol: Hang up the soaking wet article to "drip" dry Hang up the soaking wet article to “drip” dry.
Drying symbol: After extraction of excess water, dry the article on a suitable flat surface After extraction of excess water, dry the article on a suitable flat surface.
Drying symbol: Dry in the shade Dry in the shade (symbol added to line dry, drip dry, or dry flat).
Drying symbol: Do not dry Do not dry. To be used with “Do not wash” symbol .
Symbol Description
Ironing/pressing symbol: Iron with or without steam by hand, or press on commercial equipment, at a high temperature (not exceeding 200°C) Iron with or without steam by hand, or press on commercial equipment, at a high temperature (not exceeding 200°C). Recommended temperature for cotton and linen textiles.
Ironing/pressing symbol: Iron with or without steam by hand, or press on commercial equipment, at a medium temperature (not exceeding 150°C) Iron with or without steam by hand, or press on commercial equipment, at a medium temperature (not exceeding 150°C). Recommended temperature for polyester, rayon, silk, triacetate and wool textiles.
Ironing/pressing symbol: Iron with or without steam by hand, or press on commercial equipment, at a low temperature (not exceeding 110°C) Iron with or without steam by hand, or press on commercial equipment, at a low temperature (not exceeding 110°C). Recommended temperature for acetate, acrylic, modacrylic, nylon, polypropylene and spandex textiles.
Ironing/pressing symbol: Do not steam Do not steam.
Ironing/pressing symbol: Do not iron or press Do not iron or press.

As of 1997, manufacturers could use either words, symbols or a combination of both.

For word labels, the instructions will usually be listed in English and another common language such as French or Spanish. Brands that have far international reach, or wish to market themselves as such, may have five or six languages on their labels.
What is the RN #?
A registered identification number or RN is a number issued by the Federal Trade Commission, upon request, to a business residing in the U.S. that is engaged in the manufacture, importing, distribution, or sale of textile, wool, or fur products. Such businesses are not required to have RNs. They may, however, use the RN in place of a name on the label or tag that is required to be affixed to these products.
The RN#, can be helpful in determining the age of a garment. You can also identify the maker or importer of the garment. RN#s may be printed on the care label, or on the maker name label.  CAUTION:  The RN# issue date does not give the manufacture date of the garment.

 

WPL numbers were issued from 1941 through 1959 under the Wool Products Labeling Act. WPL numbers begin at 00101 and end at 13669. All numbers issued subsequently are RN numbers.

RN numbers were issued under the Fur Products Labeling Act from 1952 through 1959. These numbers start at 00101 and continue to 04086. Beginning in 1959, all numbers issued are RN under the combined act and commence with 13670. The final number contained in this edition is 112208. Complete rules and regulations under the Wool Act,Fur Act, and the Textile Fiber Products Identification Act can be obtained by writing to Textile Section, Division of Enforcement, Federal Trade Commission, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue. NW,Washington, D.C. 20580.
Once you find the RN #, you can look it up on the RN database. The database started August 6, 1998, and that is the default issue date given to all existing RN #s at that time. If you look up the RN # and see an issue date of August 6, 1998, the number was actually issued earlier. Expired numbers were not entered into the database. This is a link to the database:

https://rn.ftc.gov/pls/TextileRN/wrnquery$.startup (I have tried to log in here and page failed to load…VN)

You can enter the RN #, or WPL #, and a search will bring up the company that has that number. This is very helpful if you have the RN # and no maker tag. If the company is in the database, you can find out who made or imported the garment. Some older numbers may not appear in the database if they were not current when the database was created.

If you have a maker tag, and you are trying to determine how old the garment is, but you don’t have the RN #, you can enter the company name into the database, and, if the company has a number, it will come up with the company name and address.

How to Estimate the RN # Issue Date
Since the database doesn’t have the actual issue dates for the numbers before August 6, 1998, how do we determine approximately when the number was issued?

A formula was worked out on the Vintage Clothing & Accessories Board by nouveauarts and me. This works only for the numbers issued since 1959. It was determined that an average of 2635 numbers have been issued per year. The earliest number in the series beginning in 1959 is 13670. The formula is:

Your RN #
-13670 (first RN # in series)
Total #s between the original and yours/2635(average #s issued per year) = # of years since issue date
1959 + # of years since issue date = estimated year of issue

What Does the Estimated Year of Issue Tell You?
This is NOT the date the garment was made.  It is the earliest date the garment could have been made. It is not the date the garment was made because companies may keep the same RN # as long as they are in business. It is helpful if you have something you think may have been made in either the 1960s or the 1980s. If the RN # was issued in the 80s, you can rule out the earlier dates. If it was issued in the 60s, you will need to use other means to determine a date for the garment.

NOTE: If something has an RN # of 13670 or higher, it cannot be older than 1959.

CA #s
The equivalent registration number in Canada is a CA #, and may be researched on the Canadian government site. CA Identification Number Search:

http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/app/cb/cnmbr/srchFrm.do;jsessionid=00015mL-_10V8S0ydjauWDe1R82:N08BLK1QO?lang=eng


Resources:

http://www.oqlf.gouv.qc.ca/english/infoguides/selling/selling.html

http://www.ehow.co.uk/list_6082830_laws-clothing-label-requirements.html

http://reviews.ebay.com/Clothing-Labels-RN-and-WPL-and-CA_W0QQugidZ10000000003229985

http://www.textileaffairs.com/lguide.htm

Next Time: I have started loading clothing into my store Shuushuu by LuLu and I will have some photos of models wearing the vintage clothing.